about dichroic

 The same simple arrangement of dichroic looks very different in response to changing viewpoints and the angle and intensity of light falling on the work. 

The same simple arrangement of dichroic looks very different in response to changing viewpoints and the angle and intensity of light falling on the work. 

I work with a material called dichroic - meaning two colour. It is an optical coating (originally developed by NASA in the 1960s) that selectively reflects certain wavelengths of light and allows the remaining wavelengths to transmit through. 

The material itself is transparent, however it shifts from being reflective like a golden mirror to vibrantly coloured or almost transparent depending upon the viewpoint and angle of light. 

Light is key to the magic of my wall panels. They will respond to both natural and artificial light - the effect ranges from soft and muted to bright and sharp depending on the intensity of the light.

They are extra special if placed in an environment which receives some natural light from a window or a skylight because as the sun moves around the sky or is concealed/revealed by clouds the panel’s colours and patterns also change.

The key thing to get right is that the light falling on the panel needs to be at an angle to the dichroic pieces in order to create the best range of projections and reflections of colour. On a wall with a window to the left or right or above is perfect ... whereas a wall with a window in front of it - not so good.

At night the ambient artificial light in the room will have its own impact on the panel and of course you can also play with strategic spot lighting.